BCHF News Students capture heritage on film in Langley

Students capture heritage on film in Langley

Looking for new ways to engage youth in local history?

The Langley Heritage Society is collaborating with local high school students to create and share short films about the people who once lived in the heritage buildings restored by the Society.

Four videos have been produced to date. The most recent film, released in June 2017, documents the World-War-I-era Dixon House and Barn. Other films tell the stories behind the CN Station, Wark/Dumais House and Michaud House. The films are also available on the Langley Heritage Society YouTube channel.

How does the partnership work?

Brookswood Secondary School Grade 12 student Brayden Chapelas records video footage of the heritage CN Station in Fort Langley, 2016. Photo: Mark Forsythe.
Brookswood Secondary School student Brayden Chapelas records video footage of the heritage CN Station in Fort Langley, 2016. Photo: Mark Forsythe.

The project, now in its second year, is a partnership between the Langley Heritage Society and the Brookswood Secondary School TV and Film Program (aka Backstreet Studios), with support from the Langley Centennial Museum.

Mark Forsythe, project lead with the Langley Heritage Society explains:

“We give Brookswood Secondary School TV and Film Program $500 each fall for ongoing equipment needs. As a former CBC Radio broadcaster, I work with students on filming interviews, plotting out the story, etc.

“[Brookswood] teacher Robert French is keen to give his students some real-world experience. We also have a good working relationship with the Langley Centennial Museum, which allows use of their archival photos.

“The students have amazing skills and find themselves becoming drawn into local history.”

Some students have the opportunity to help produce videos about houses their ancestors lived in, says Forsythe. He adds that the project complements the Langley Heritage Society’s ongoing school programs (like funding for museum trips, Heritage Fairs and youth volunteers at the CN Station), while the films themselves make the Society’s new web site more interesting and engaging.

The video production partnership will continue to document stories behind other heritage homes in the Langley Heritage Society’s inventory of restored buildings.